Ghada Adel is hot property – seemingly overnight everyone wants a piece of this picture-perfect screen princess. In the media frenzy surrounding the actress it’s easy to forget that Adel isn’t some wide-eyed new ingénue in the movie industry. Her acting career already spans an impressive ten years. Nancy-Sarah Barakat digs deep to find out about the wife, mother (of five!) and woman behind the striking persona, while Fashion Director Maissa Azab dresses the stunning star in Spring’s sexiest styles…

 

You’re evidently on a career high at the moment. How do you make sure you choose the right projects?

The two things that have worked the most for me are luck and my husband Magdy. He has great vision, understanding, and a lot more experience than I do. I rely on his expertise a lot. If I shine in a certain role, it’ll probably be one that he’s chosen. The guidance he gives me is essential.

So what part has allowed you to really shine?

Nothing yet! Each part I’ve played has brought out something but not everything. In Mallaki Iskandariya (Private Alexandria) I was able to give the impression of innocence but actually be deceptive.

. I was a comedian in the series Mabrouk Galak A’alaa (Congratulations You’ve Got Trouble) and with Fi Shaeet Masr El Gededa (In the Heliopolis Flat) the whole mood was different. Each character I’ve portrayed was able to bring out something new in me; but what I want is to choose some exceptional roles in the future, and not just play parts that don’t add to my resume.

Is there a character you dream of portraying but has yet to be offered to you?

I want to be evil. I know I look innocent but I don’t want to be pigeonholed into the innocent/angelic female roles. Even when I did Mallaki, the whole storyline revolved around the fact that I looked trusting but turned out to be opposite; so it added to the twist. What I’d love to play now is an evil character from start to finish; with all that evil entails.

What don’t you like about show business?

I don’t hate anything in particular, but it can get very competitive and sometimes people misconstrue the decisions you make. Like if you turn down a part, people don’t necessarily understand why you made your decision and get offended.

How do you deal with media-rumours?

That’s probably what I hate most about this business. I abhor that as a celebrity the smallest thing you do can be hyped-up by the media or taken out of context.

You talk about your husband as a contributing factor to your success… Tell us more about him?

Magdy has helped me all the way, and encourages me to try new things that I probably wouldn’t have considered without his guidance. It was his idea that I do Fi Shaeet Masr El Gededa (In the Heliopolis Flat). I was anxious about the whole project but he had faith in me. I didn’t think I’d be able to do it. Now, whenever I get an award for the part, Magdy teases me about it.

It’s obvious that you love him, how did the two of you meet?

I met him while I was auditioning for a programme he was producing. I guess he was also looking for a partner at the time, so he chose me to be his bride and chose someone else to do the programme! He’s been my rock through it all, and he’s made me who I am today.

What do you love most about him?

I love that he loves his home, children and my success. Magdy can be very busy but will put everything aside to help me. He’s also extremely intelligent and makes me feel very secure. I depend on him completely.

What do you remember most about your wedding day?

It was one of the best days of my life. But what I love most is my life with Magdy and the security he gives me. That’s what every woman looks for in a relationship.

You have five wonderful children, how on earth do you juggle your career and family?

I love spending time with my children, and they’ve also helped me love my work, because they love seeing me on screen. And that motivates me to do more to be a better actress.

So who is Ghada Adel?

I’m just a normal person. A mother, a wife and a person who does a job she loves. It hasn’t gotten to my head; you can ask anyone who knows me. I try not to pay attention to my celebrity so I can live a normal life.

Is there one thing you love most about yourself?

I love that I’m a mother, and that I have a complete life away from work. My family is my priority.

What do you hate most about yourself?

I trust people too quickly, and I hate it when I get the wrong impression about someone. I’m an open book, and sometimes I think others are like that too. So when that doesn’t turn out to be the case, I retreat into a state of depression.

How have your own parents influenced you?

They’ve taught me to be kind to others and not to offend anyone, but that’s made me into a non-confrontational and emotional person. I honestly don’t want my children to be like that. I want them to have strong independent personalities but I won’t tolerate arrogance.

What are your fondest childhood memories?

I’m still living my childhood, I swear! I love to play with my children. I feel that I’m their age. My inner-child is very much alive. Before we had kids, Magdy always asked me when I’d grow up. I thought that would happen when I had children, but it hasn’t!

If you could re-live your life, are there things you would change?

I wouldn’t really want to change anything, but I’d like to have had the same knowledge and maturity that I have now earlier on so I could have made better choices

. I would have probably changed a lot of things about my personality, as I don’t handle disappointment well.

You’re beautiful inside and out…Do you see that as a burden or a blessing?

Being a good person is innate. I don’t know whether it’s been a burden or a blessing, I’m just being myself and I hope this helps me connect with my audience, and meet their expectations. I’m very thankful for my physical beauty but I don’t see myself as stunning. I have a couple of things I’d like to change but Magdy won’t let me. Quite honestly I’d probably be too scared to go under the knife. I’ve seen so many beautiful women who have had work done and ended up looking terrible. Someone once told me I needed to love my flaws and treat them as a unique part of me; as something that makes me special. When I let go of my physical beauty in Fi Shaket Masr El Gedeeda (In the Heliopolis Flat) that’s when I shone as an actress.

So what do you consider beautiful?

Confidence and being yourself is beautiful. A woman’s personality is beautiful, you can have someone who’s average looking with a great sense of humour and she’ll most probably be more attractive than a flawless woman with zero personality.

Physical attributes don’t last forever but what’s within lasts a lifetime.

Where do you see yourself in the future?

I’m not aiming for a particular goal, all I care about is that I do things that I’m proud of and produce work that may lead to me receiving an honorary award one day.

What’s the one thing that you want people to know about you?

I want them to know that I’m not a pushover. I’m strong and I can stand up for myself. But I wasn’t raised to be spiteful and that gets misinterpreted. At the end of the day goodness will always prevail. I won’t change who I am to please others, I will always be myself and that’s who I want to be loved for.