These are the innovators, game changers, and trendsetters who are determined to forge their own paths. Each one of these young society sensations is fluent in the art of hard work, has a passion to realise his or her dreams, and has become a trailblazer always ready for the next challenge.  All the while, maintaining their cool, looking stylish and having fun. Spanning the gamut from the rough and tumble world of sports management, all the way to the alluring world of fashion, these eight society stars, each with a distinctive lifestyle and career choice, sat down with eniGma’s Farida El Sayed, to tell the story of their journey and what their dreams are as they look forward. Don’t let the sequins and bow ties fool you, these super good-looking trailblazers mean serious business.

Mamdouh Eid

Behind the rising careers of some of Egypt’s most beloved football players like Mohamed Elneny, Ahmed Fathy, and Amr Warda, is an astute young football agent called Mamdouh Eid.

Mamdouh EidAlthough he graduated with a degree in architectural engineering, Eid feels that he was always destined to partake in the world of football. “My family founded four clubs, and two of them actually went on to win the Africa Cup of Nations. As a young boy, growing up in that environment encouraged me to play football and organise football tournaments at school. I also played for a very short time in America,” he explains.

Eid notes that his father’s cousin served as the director of the Egyptian national team during the World Cup in 1990 and 1998, and through him he got to learn first-hand about the ins and outs of the business. “I learned a lot from him and I was always involved in what he did. I met so many people in the football scene and began making my own connections along the way,” he adds.

Not surprisingly, Eid took his fascination with football a notch further by pursuing a sports management degree in Switzerland. He went on to gain invaluable expertise by joining one of the leading sports management companies in the world, SEM Group, which represented players such as Thierry Henry and Ian Wright. He proudly recalls, “At some point it was the biggest group in the world, so I learnt a lot, especially from the CEO, Jerome Anderson, with whom I shared a lot of common interests.” At SEM, Eid steadily learned more tricks of the trade and eventually held the highly prestigious position of being Director of Football for the MENA region, before becoming an independent football agent back in Egypt. Eid says, “I don’t just want to be a well-known agent. I also want to help football in my country. I want to recondition the mentality, to make it more in line with standards abroad and more professional.”
A proud moment for this young sports magnate was the 2018 World Cup, which witnessed Egypt’s participation in the championship after an absence of 20 years. “For me, it was a great honour to represent Egypt in the World Cup with Ahmed Fathy, who was captain of the team for the first two games. It was a great honour for me to be sitting there supporting Egypt and working with other players, like Essam El Hadary who became the oldest player to participate in the World Cup,” he proudly recalls.

While Eid is always super busy working tirelessly with the biggest players in the football industry, he also gets to enjoy some of the perks that come with the territory. He can often be seen jet-setting with his players around the world and attending the most sought-after parties and events.  Nevertheless, as he himself notes, the ups and downs of this fickle business can take a toll on a person’s mind, body, and soul.  However, Eid’s confidence in himself and in his players keeps him grounded and always moving forward towards his goal of becoming one of the most sought-after sports agents in the world.

eniGma Questionnaire

What aspect of your personality would you like to change?
I would like to give things more of a chance, rather than writing them off immediately.

What’s one thing you like to do when you’re not working?
Partying and connecting with good friends and people who matter in my life.

What is your favourite part about your job?
That it’s not boring.

What was your first job?
Being a basketball player for Gezira Club.

What is your idea of happiness?
My idea of happiness is to enjoy everything you do.

Heba Serag Eldin

This out and about society star and fashionista has brilliantly actualised her passion for fashion into a business.  She has been making a name for herself in the burgeoning local fashion industry through her company, Fashion Funds Egypt. The company is known for holding bi-annual events that showcase the latest fashion brands across the country. It is also known to dedicate 15% – 30% of its profits to support charity causes. Serag Eldin’s fashion sense and her unique sense of style have been essential to her success in attracting edgy brands and to drawing A-list clients, including VIPs and celebrities to her events.

Heba Serag EldinA fashionista from a young age, Serag Eldin feels that she was destined to find her way into the fashion industry. “Shortly after graduation, in 2012, I created one of the first e-commerce websites in Egypt called Fashion Garage,” she explains. The website featured two departments, a section for pre-loved items while another section highlighted emerging designers. Even though she enjoyed her first project, she still felt that it wasn’t her true calling. While she liked the idea of fashion events and PR, she wanted to stray away from the traditional bazaars. “I wanted to create something that was fun, family-friendly, and chic all at the same time,” she adds.

Serag Eldin’s unique success at curating stylish brands, combined with her top-notch execution, brought rave reviews to Fashion Funds ever since its debut in 2014. Her winning formula lies in her ability to be cross-generational while maintaining a distinct air of elegance. Even though she’s been successful at attracting VIPs, prominent social figures, and celebrities to her events, her top goal is to deliver a high-quality showcase to her participating designers. “The moment I feel truly accomplished is when designers call me after the event to thank me, both for the execution and the good time they had,” she exclaims.

Another important part of Fashion Funds is its philanthropic aspect. Rather than continuing to give the money to big charity organisations, Serag Eldin recently decided to personally identify worthy personal cases in need of help. “I wanted to feel the impact we make with the funds we provide. I wanted to find cases that I can follow up with and check on,” she explains. Her quest recently led her to Arwa, a three-year old girl who was in desperate need for a liver transplant and she became the recipient of Fashion Funds’ support.

With the success of her business, Serag Eldin finds that it is sometimes difficult to balance being a single mother and a businesswoman at the same time. “Simple actions like waking my son up, making his breakfast, and walking him to the bus bring so much happiness to me. But some days you can’t be there for them because of business commitments. I like to remind myself that this doesn’t make you a bad mother, it just makes you a woman who is trying to make something for herself and for her child. I feel it’s very important to make your children proud.”

While Serag Eldin has evidently found her calling, she still has much she wants to accomplish. Her big dream is to open a fashion school. “My dream is to combine my passion with my family business, and to have my own fashion school. I would get professionals to teach and we would help emerging designers get certified,” she excitedly explains. With her experience and success so far, along with her sophisticated taste and wide range of connections, it is easy to imagine that realising her dream may soon be within her grasp.

eniGma Questionnaire

What aspect of your personality would you like to change?
I am a little too sensitive and I would also like to be less controlling. I need to learn to chill more and get rid of unwanted energy.

What’s one thing you like to do when you’re not working?
Netflix and chill.

What’s your favourite part about your job?
Connecting with people.

What was your first ever job?
My website, Fashion Garage.

What is your idea of happiness?
Happiness is not a phase in life nor a state of mind. Happiness is moments. It’s about the little moments that pass you by and you have to be mentally and emotionally sober enough to see happiness and to hold on to it.

Tamer Banna

If you’ve ever experienced an unforgettable party, where the music hits the sweet spot, the drinks are flowing, and you’re surrounded by the ultimate crowd, then you’ve definitely been seduced by Tamer Banna’s event planning company, Beyond Entertainment.

Tamer Banna

It all started while he was still heavily involved in his family’s business which he ran with his brothers, when, on a whim, he decided to throw a Halloween party.  “That was 11 years ago, and the party went big,” he recalls.  It went so big that it was too late to turn back. The party bug had bitten him bad. “The rush of doing an event and witnessing the excitement of the guests is so addictive. Once you finish planning for one event, you can’t wait to start planning for the next one. It never ends,” he excitedly explains.  Although it is quite hectic, and at times Banna works up to 18 hours a day, his genuine passion for his job, his keen eye for details and his ability to engage a diverse crowd of people, ensure a memorable party time after time.

From impressive New Year’s parties in El Gouna, to the annual AUC after-grad celebration, Beyond Entertainment’s roster features a wide range of clients. Having dominated the party scene for over a decade, it might seem like there are no dreams left to be accomplished by this party connoisseur; but Banna still has a very important goal in mind. “I want to put Egypt on the map in terms of attracting A-list artists. What is missing completely from the party scene in this country is the presence of global artists, and in light of the devaluation it’s very hard to execute an event without a big budget. Additionally, due to a series of previous events with global artists which, unfortunately, were chaotic and unsuccessful, securing the presence of international names is not easy. You will find that international artists are worried about coming to Egypt, either because they personally have had a bad experience, which makes them think twice about returning, or they may have heard that it was not a great experience for their colleagues, which makes them refuse to consider a proposal to perform here,” he explains.

Despite being deeply involved in the party scene in Egypt, this smooth operator is actually a low-key personality and is difficult to discern amidst a crowd of people. He explains, “I was never into being a public figure. I only started using Facebook and Instagram for the company, not for myself. I’m not the person who will go on stage and take a picture with the artist or post about my work; it is not my character. I prefer being behind the scenes and making sure things are going the right way. Taking the credit and being a public figure is not really my cup of tea.”

eniGma Questionnaire

What aspect of your personality would you like to change?
My friends say I’m selfish.

What’s one thing you like to do when you’re not working?
Partying, working out and spending time with friends.

What’s your favourite part about your job?
Connecting with people.

What was your first ever job?
I was a DJ at a party for my first girlfriend at BISC; I was 18 then. She chose me because I was mixing when we were spending time together, that was the first time someone paid me for my services.

What is your idea of happiness?
I learnt from experience that happiness will only happen once you give back to everyone around you. This is the only source of happiness. You’ll feel really happy when you give your time or your resources to someone else, by helping other people.

Jude Benhalim

It’s already been a few years since Jude Benhalim, now twenty-five years old, successfully broke into the world of jewellery in Egypt.  Synonymous with intricate craftsmanship and worldly allure while fusing traditional Egyptian craftsmanship with edgy bold designs, her jewellery brand resonates very well with the modern day woman in Egypt and elsewhere. In fact, her proudest moments are when she randomly encounters girls and women wearing Jude Benhalim pieces. “It makes me so proud” she exclaims.

Jude BenhalimBenhalim’s beautiful jewellery is stocked in various department stores throughout the Middle East, and her designs have been featured in several international magazines. Her brand also recently celebrated the opening of her first flagship store in the stylish borough of Zamalek.

Looking back, Benhalim’s entry into the world of jewellery came about in an unexpected manner. As she recalls, “I was 17 years old, and a necessary component of my high school International Baccalaureate (IB) program was to implement a creative venture. So I bought some materials from Khan El Khalili, put them together, and sold them at a charity bazaar. Surprisingly, it turned out to be a really big success.”  Impressed by the favourable outcome of the bazaar, and the rewarding feeling her daughter experienced while producing her jewellery items, Benhalim’s mother decided to make an interesting proposition to Benhalim.

“My mother suggested that we become business partners and pursue this as a full-time career together,” recalls Benhalim. They have been partners from the start. But, Benhalim laments that her mother rarely receives her due credit.  “Although it is understandable, since the brand is named after me, it’s sad that my mother’s role is not sufficiently acknowledged. A lot of people don’t know that we co-founded the brand together. I always try to push her to the spotlight but she is just indifferent,” Benhalim explains. And it’s not only her mother who has had a positive impact on Benhalim.  She attributes her willpower and sense of creativity to her architect father, who had a great influence on her.

Having dreamt of becoming a film director one day, after graduating from high school Benhalim joined the American University in Cairo to study film, while continuing to work on her jewellery line on the side. As she recalls, “It was pretty challenging to juggle school, work and a social life. On the other hand, I still wanted to pursue a film career.”  However, after joining a couple of film sets and getting a closer look at the industry, she was discouraged. She turned away from film, and delved deeper into jewellery.

Set to be married next year, Benhalim insists that she, nonetheless, firmly intends to continue being a career woman. Looking forward to her brand’s future, she says, “I hope to expand internationally, but in a subtle manner. I would like to be in some international stores, but I still want to remain exclusive. I don’t want to branch out too much so as not to become too commercial.”

eniGma Questionnaire

What is the one aspect in your personality you would change?
Being a perfectionist, and also being fearful. I’d like to live more on the edge.

What do you like to do when you’re not working?
Hanging out with my friends and fiancée.

What’s your favourite part about your job?
The design part. Seeing the sketches come to life.

What is the most terrifying thing you’ve ever done?
I jumped off a plane in Prague. It was so liberating.

What is your idea of happiness?
Happiness is not a state of mind, it’s a momentary feeling. Living in the now, appreciating the small things in life.

Mohamed El Bassiouni

At 29 years old, with his wife and son in tow, Mohamed El Bassiouni boldly risked it all by leaving Alexandria and moving to Cairo to pursue a career in the entertainment industry. It was a far cry from his engineering job at his family business. Despite the uncertainty that lay in front of him, Bassiouni soon became a player in Egypt’s media landscape. Now, almost a decade later, he codirects Tayarah, one of the country’s leading digital platforms for entertaining, inspiring, and unique video content.
Mohamed El Bassiouny

The turning point for Bassiouni came in 2011 with the Egyptian Revolution. “I was inspired by everything going on.  That’s when I got the idea to do videos with content and programs that would showcase emerging talents with interesting opinions,” he fervently explains. In 2012, he partnered up with a fellow producer, Magdi Omar, and established the online platform, Disalata. The platform soon became the go-to source for video content that both informed and delighted viewers. From food to football, it featured a wide range of programs and was able to produce a highly successful parody video, Hobba Egyptian Style; which became the 7th highest watched video in the region in 2012.

After running Disalata for two years, a major managerial shift occurred when Bassiouni’s partner decided to move to Canada. Still yearning to collaborate and create compelling content, Bassiouni decided to partner with one of Disalata’s rising talents, Ramez Youssef, to create their own company, Tayarah. According to Bassiouni, “Ramez and I had very good chemistry, and he had a lot of ideas to add to the platform. He knows how to multitask. There is a certain work and social life balance that he plays very well – for the both of us together.”

Established in 2014, Tayarah has a distinct logo of a flying kite that serves as the mantra for the company’s code of conduct. “It signifies, that from very simple tools you can do something that looks really good and the sky’s the limit,” Bassiouni explains. Over the past four years, Tayarah has been an influential figure in the media-sphere due to its distinct ability to create highly entertaining and original content for its own platform, while also creating innovative video content for other brands.

According to Bassiouni, a major milestone for the company came in 2016, when Hend Sabri and her husband Ahmed El Sherif decided to become partners in Tayarah. Bassiouni spiritedly explains, “They have been a great addition to the team and the company. Hend Sabri is brilliant and she has great expertise in the field. Meanwhile, her husband is a stellar businessman. The financial side, in terms of cash flow management and growth, is handled very well by him and his team.”

Most recently, Tayarah’s presence was felt through their innovative show El’ab Ya Negm (Play with the Star), which features lighthearted and witty celebrity interviews. The show served as a truly immersive digital experience for anyone who missed out on the El Gouna Film Festival. “Everyone’s already on Instagram Stories so why not do a program on it?” says Bassiouni, highlighting one of the ways Tayarah has managed to pioneer in the field of video content.

Clearly, Bassiouni and Tayarah are making their mark in the entertainment industry.  As he and his team continue to innovate and explore new ideas, “the sky’s the limit,” according to the company’s own logo.

eniGma Questionnaire
What aspect of your personality would you like to change?
Sometimes I’m a bit lazy; when I’m not passionate about things I become lazy.

What’s one thing you like to do when you’re not working?
Travel.

What’s your favourite part about your job?
That it is not boring, there’s always room for creativity.

What was your first ever job?
I used to own a restaurant, called Down Under, with a couple of friends while we were in university. It served all types of food, this was about 17-18 years ago.

What’s the most terrifying thing you’ve ever done?
Bungee jumping.

Clorinda Siag

After graduating from London’s Central Saint Martin’s with a degree in Fashion Communication, Clorinda Siag, returned to Cairo, ready to join the ranks of the local fashion industry. She soon connected with a family friend, Omar Madkour, the CEO of Cairo Fashion Festival (CFF) to discuss her prospects in the still nascent fashion industry in Egypt.  “I sat down with him and told him about how I was yearning to find a fashion job that could interest me,” she recalls.

Clorinda Siag

Sure enough, Madkour asked her to join the CFF team as an event coordinator. She was put in charge of booking models as well as discovering emerging designers, some of whom, like Temraza, Imaan Saab, and Norine Farah, have become household names now and have even gained international recognition.  “Being able to closely witness the current fashion revolution in Egypt was quite wonderful. I’ve learned so much working with all of these people and getting the full experience, from booking the models all the way up to planning production,” she explains.

While working at CFF, Siag realised that they were using the same bloggers year after year to come and support the event and she eventually got tired of that. “There was a list of about ten people that we would use and reuse. I got super bored and tired of this monotony. But I also knew that if I wanted to hire someone new, there was no way of knowing if that person was good or not. I would have to try them out and wait to track their engagement,” she recalls. “I wished there was a database where brands could see all the influencers and their statistics on one portal, in order to be able to communicate with them,” she adds.  This was when the idea of Trendster was born.

Siag, together with her long-term boyfriend, Ali Ezzat, started their start-up, Trendster some seven months ago, and they are working tirelessly to officially launch it soon. Trendster’s unique selling point is that it acts as the ideal platform for linking influencers and brands. “The system uses an algorithm that collects data from various social influencers and puts it in a readable graph. Brands can then connect to influencers who have similar objectives and vice versa,” she explains.  To uphold business integrity, Trendster makes sure both parties agree on a posting timeline; and only after the bloggers fulfill their role, does the money get passed on to them.

Even though running a business with your significant other might seem taxing, Siag would not have it any other way. “It takes a lot of effort, so you have to work with a person you genuinely connect with and can trust through thick and thin,” she says. Most recently, competing with thousands of other startups at the Greek Campus, the dynamic duo were selected by a start-up accelerator who will provide them with seed money, mentorship, and connections to help speed the development of Trendster.

With work on Trendster now in full swing, Siag has decided that she needs to devote all of her time to it. This means that this year’s CFF will be the last one for her. However, she will always have a close connection to CFF, which gave her the opportunity to delve into the fashion industry and where she gained so much experience and made so many friends.

eniGma Questionnaire
What aspect of your personality would you like to change?
I don’t know how to pay attention for very long. I’d like to be more focused.

What’s one thing you like to do when you’re not working?
Netflix and chill with my boyfriend

What’s your favourite part about your job?
That every day is different; it is never repetitive.

What was your first ever job?
I interned at Tom Ford.

What is your idea of happiness?
Waking up on a boat in the middle of the water at like five in the morning.

Omar Khalifa

At 34 years old, Omar Khalifa is already heading two very successful ventures, Omedia and Shaghalni.com, making him an entrepreneurial success story.
Omar Khalifa

Khalifa had always dreamt of becoming his own boss. It was, therefore, not surprising that soon after graduating from the American University in Cairo with a degree in Political Science, he set up his own company, Omedia, in 2009. It was a novel idea at the time. As he recounts it, “ Omedia started as a publishing company, which would buy international licenses for magazines, such as The New York Times and The Economist. We would pay them royalty fees and keep the same content, but we would sell local advertisements to place between the pages.” However, not long after business started to gain momentum, the Egyptian Revolution erupted in 2011, and like many other businesses at the time, Khalifa found himself in financial trouble. “Before the revolution, a major publisher wanted to merge with us, and I ended up selling advertisements worth one million pounds. But I got carried away and ended up overspending. When the revolution suddenly erupted, the publisher backed out of the merger and all pending advertisements were canceled,” he recalls. Khalifa was mired in debt for three years, and he ended up having to sell off many of his precious personal items to help pay off his creditors.

During the traumatic period he went through, Khalifa decided to go live in El Gouna. “I didn’t close the company, but I needed to breathe,” he recounts sadly. A chance encounter with media tycoon Tarek Nour at El Gouna’s Pier 88 was all he needed to change the forlorn course of his life at the time. “I had thought of the idea to set up billboards in front of El Gouna’s gates, and I proposed it to him. He was impressed and was ready to partner with me,” Khalifa adds.  To test the practicality of the proposal, Nour’s team waited for him to sell two billboards before they started to build. “It was my first time to sell any billboards. I was lucky,” he says with a smile. Working with Nour gradually put Khalifa back on track financially.

Khalifa also always had another idea for a project at the back of his mind. It was for a digital platform called Shaghalni.com. that would connect workers with employers. Its unique selling point was that it would connect blue and grey collar workers with registered employers. “An average company can need up to 1,000 or 8,000 production workers. We have thousands of opportunities for blue and grey collar job seekers. These people don’t have smartphones and they are not on Facebook or LinkedIn. So how do you reach these 33 million people? Well, we went to the poorest areas in Egypt to collect data on suitable candidates and set up self-registration kiosks,” he explains. But even though the implementation of his platform could potentially help solve the gripping unemployment problem in Egypt, his search for financing was paved with a lot of rejections from venture capitalists; until he decided, fortuitously, to reach out to the business tycoon, Naguib Sawiris, in 2015.

Sawiris instantly invited him to his office. “It was a five-minute meeting; there was no time to break the ice,” says Khalifa, adding, “He immediately delved into business and asked me a series of questions; and he said he would come on board. I needed someone like him. Not only does he give credibility to the company, but he is also passionate both about the cause and about business.  He is someone who truly cares about Egypt.”

Nowadays, due to the genuine impact it creates, Khalifa chooses to spend most of his time on Shaghalni.com. But Omedia is also going strong. At the end of the day, Khalifa is a natural entrepreneur. He is a wonderful example of someone who pulls himself up with willpower and determination after being down. He is also someone with a heart who cares about helping others.

eniGma Questionnaire
What aspect of your personality would you like to change?
My temper.

What’s one thing you like to do when you’re not working?
Fishing. I would go to the sea everyday if I could.

What’s your favourite part about your job?
It never feels like a “job.” I love it.

What was your first job ever?
As an intern. I worked in a call center at a telecommunications company.

What is your idea of happiness?
Health is number one, but success comes right after it. It depends on your goal and what you want to do, but if you’re fulfilling your goal and you are content, then that’s success.

Amena El-Saie

Dressed in an elaborately sequined evening gown, Amena El-Saie, was tirelessly tapping away at her keyboard between intervals during this month’s Enigma’s cover shoot. In this young social entrepreneur’s life, there isn’t a minute’s rest. El-Saie is a co-founder of Helm, an organization that helps people with disabilities become active members of society while also aiming to transform the outdated way they are viewed by others. Together with her fellow co-founder, Ramez Maher and their team, she hopes to play a part in providing equal opportunities to all Egyptians.

Amena El-SaieEl-Saie’s venture into social activism was not planned. “I had always dreamt of becoming an artist. But at the same time, I always knew that I wanted to impact other people’s lives,” she explains.  A pivotal moment came when, while still a university student, she took part in a unique exhibition called Dialogue in the Dark during her semester abroad in Germany. The exhibition was an attempt to change stereotypical perceptions by having participants carry out mundane activities while blindfolded. “Each of the activities contributed to a transforming journey. It taught us things like how to walk in the dark and how to differentiate between types of food through our sense of smell. It was a life-altering experience for me,” El-Saie recalls.

Sometime later, during a casual conversation with friends, destiny showed her the career path she was meant to take. “I told Ramez how Dialogue in the Dark had affected me, and how I thought Egypt needed similar initiatives. In return, Ramez told me about his own first-hand experience with a blind classmate at one of his classes at AUC, where neither the teacher nor his classmates were equipped to deal with that student’s special needs.” As they discussed their experiences, they realised that they both shared a passion to transform the lives of people with disabilities, and quite spontaneously they decided to start something together. The very next day, they started making calls and got the ball rolling. Ever since, they haven’t stopped working to achieve their goals.

“Close to 15 million people in Egypt live with a disability, making it a very pressing and difficult problem to tackle,” says El-Saie. To positively impact the lives of those with disabilities, the team focuses on two aspects: accessibility and education. Since the establishment of Helm Foundation in 2014, El-Saie along with her partner and hard-working team, have been working closely with the government to increase the availability of premises that are accessible to all. Most recently, Helm focused its efforts on making Cairo University and its surrounding area accessible to people with disabilities, through their click-funding video, One Click to Move. The powerful video features Ahmed Malik and Menna Shalaby reenacting the everyday struggles of persons with disabilities. At the same time, El-Saie explains, that “to provide increased and sustained employment opportunities for the disabled, the Helm foundation established, Helm Consulting LLC, which works on a global and local level to provide consultancy for top companies and multinationals on how to deal with people with disabilities and include them in workforce.”

Helm Foundation’s latest venture is an app called Entelaq, which stores the latest accessibility information on thousands of venues, thereby offering people with disabilities the chance to educate themselves before going out. Furthermore, it also gives users the chance to rate their experience with regard to accessibility.

To their credit, Helm is providing a much-needed service. They are singlehandedly redefining the social, economic, and political spheres of people with disabilities. With such a big agenda at hand, and the passion to match it, clearly El-Saie is not going to stop typing away anytime soon.

eniGma Questionnaire

What aspect of your personality would you like to change?
My temper when I’m under stress.

What’s one thing you like to do when you’re not working?
I love to paint, draw and do art.

What’s your favourite part about your job?
The people I help.

What was your first ever job?
I worked at Tatweer, an e-learning solutions company.

What’s the most terrifying thing you’ve ever done?
When I had to quit my job to start Helm. Both Ramez and I had to quit our jobs and start Helm full time and we had to do it right away.

 

Styling: Hoda Wahby
Photography: Marco Nagui – Edge Studios
Hair & Makeup: Mohamed Al Sagheer Salons

Fashion Directory:
The Boutique: Downtown Mall, Katameya, Fifth Settlement, New Cairo, Cairo, Egypt. Tel: +(202)01061511117
Dima Jewellery: 1 Al Kamel Mohamed, Zamalek, Cairo, Egypt. Tel: +(202)01221709871
Temraza: 26 Bahgat Ali St., Zamalek, Cairo, Egypt. Tel: (+202)01014400762
ORANGESQUARE: 4A Ibn El Nabih St., Behind Om Kalthoum Tower, Zamalek, Cairo. Egypt. Tel: +(202)01000082033
Amany El Cherif: 18 El-Shaheed Mohamed Abd El-Hady, Nasr City, Cairo, Egypt.  Tel: +(202)01223311628
Kojak: 2 Arab Lawyers Union Street, Garden City, Cairo, Egypt. Tel: +(202)01008148471
DStore: Citystars Mall, Omar Ibn El-Khattab St., Nasr City, Cairo, Egypt.
Jude Benhalim: 11 Hassan Sabry St., Zamalek, Cairo, Egypt. Tel: (+202)01014549465

 

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